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Some Birds I Have Seen On Our
Rutgers University Camden Campus

Pictures taken with LG camera/phone or Panasonic GS15, GS19 and GS85.  Most pictures have videos linked to them.
New birds and pictures -  Blue-headed Vireo, Scarlet Tanager, Yellow-bellied Sapsucker, Chipping Sparrow, Myrtle Warbler, Brown-headed Cowbird
New pictures -  Hermit Thrush, American WoodcockBlack and White Warbler, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Brown Thrasher, Robin Pair
Vocalizations - Ruby-crowned Kinglet, Mockingbird at BSB, Eastern Towhee, Northern Parula(1st), Black-throated Blue Warbler(2nd), Mockingbird on fence, Cedar Waxwing at BSB

Some presentations on this page may require that MS Windows Media Player be upgraded with the following codec to run MS Photo Story videos: 
for 2000 and lower  WM9Codecs9x.exe            for XP and up  WM9CodecsXP.exe


Goldfinch- State Bird Of New Jersey

Digital image from Panasonic GS-15  BSB near parking lot (8/9/2005).  Mouse click on pictures to go to Goldfinch page.

 
  Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  BSB near parking lot (8/9/2005).  Mouse click on pictures to go to Goldfinch page.

On August 9, 2005 about lunch time I took a walk over to the tennis courts to visit one of my Mockingbird "pets".  It wasn't there at that moment.  As I was standing there I noticed a small bird sitting on the seven foot high cyclone fence that surrounds a weed/wildflower covered vacant lot (behind the church next to the Ben Franklin bridge).  As I watched the bird I noticed that it seemed to have a little yellow in its coloration.  Next thing I knew two Goldfinches flew up and this third bird flew off with them to the far side of the lot.  Then I realized I had been watching a female Goldfinch.  About this time my Mockingbird flew up and I gave it some raisins.  I also pulled out my video camera and tried to get some images but the birds were out of site.  But I believed they are still in the lot area.  I walked around the church and got to the other side of the lot.  (I'm next to the far parking lot at BSB and right in front of my car.)  I saw one of the male Goldfinch and got out my camera to capture these shots.  Later in the afternoon I went back to the same area and recorded images of two males eating weed seeds.  There may have been more males there.  (As a side note - I had been looking for one of these at the front of BSB because there are purple coneflowers planted there which can attract Goldfinch.) 

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Hermit Thrush
 

On November 1, 2010 I was notified of this bird being hurt at the front of BSB.  I put it in a small box to keep it safe for a while and released it at lunch time.  It ran off into the bushes on the side of BSB.  Its wings seemed fine.  I have seen a Hermit Thrush around the building for a few weeks - this may have been the same one.  The Hermit Thrush is the only Thrush that can live around here in the winter.
 

 

Scarlet Tanager

Picture taken with a Canon Powershot A570 by Elspath Abel near the Law School (5/14/2008)

This picture was sent to me.  The bird was seen on Wednesday May 13, 2008 in the trees on 5th Street near the Law School.  The shot was taken through a window but the colors still show up very well.  I want to thank Elspath Abel (Law Library) for being so kind in sending this photo. 

 

This bird was seen at the Police Office on May 18,2006.

 

 

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 Friday April 25, 2008 I had a unique experience of seeing a host of different birds in the space of about 10 minutes.  I first encountered my Mockingbirds.  Two came by to squabble over raisons.  I put the raisons in a line rather than a pile so both could get some.  This was just outside the back door to BSB.  I walked around the west side of the building and saw a male Rufus-sided Towhee.  The Towhees have been in the area for a couple of weeks.  I then spotted an Ovenbird (a Warbler) in the same area - first of the season.  Since I was early for work I walked over to the Fine Arts area where I have seen many birds.  I wasn't disappointed.  I heard a bird singing but didn't recognize the song.  I got out my video camera to capture the audio.  I was able to see the bird also - a Ruby-crowned Kinglet.  This bird has been in the area for about 6 weeks now.  I was able to get extensive video.  It ignored me and came very close while I was taping.  During the taping I saw a flash of white which I assumed to be a White-throated Sparrow.  I got some good video of this bird later.  Also during the taping I noticed some other movement and saw a larger bird on one of the Crepe Myrtle branches.  It turned out to be a Hermit Thrush - again the first of the season but who knows since these birds can winter here but they are hard to see.  I did get some video of it also.  At one point I stopped taping to investigate some noises.  It was a Rufus-sided Towhee digging in the leaf litter under the Spreading Yews just behind the Crepe Myrtle.  So in 10 minutes - 2 new arrivals (Ovenbird & Thrush), 2 recent arrivals (Towhee & Kinglet), and 2 permanent residents (Mockingbird & White-throated Sparrow) - besides the normal Robins, House Sparrows, and Cardinals that were around.

Mouse click here to go to a page to see pictures and videos as well as sounds.

 

Friday April 30, 2010 many birds were in the area.  White-throated Sparrows were over the place.  The Ovenbird was around BSB all day.  The Hermit Thrush was in the Quad area running under the Hostas.  A Rose-breasted Grosbeak was at the feeder behind the Sociology building on Cooper St.  A Rufus-sided Towhee was in the Quad - in the Crepe Myrtle bush by the Theater.  A Blue-headed Vireo was seen behind BSB.  And the ever-present Mockingbird was around asking for raisins and chasing the Catbird.

 

 

Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (woodpecker)
Video in Windows Media format
MS Photo Story presentation Video in Real Media format

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  at Fine Arts (4/15/2008).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

Around lunch time Tuesday April 15, 2008 while watching the Rufus-sided Towhees and a Brown Thrasher in the area by the Fine Arts building, I caught a glimpse of a small black and white bird in one of the trees.  I thought it might be a Downy Woodpecker but the back was "messy".  I also thought it might be a Black and White Warbler.  But I didn't get much of a look at it and no video.  Later in the afternoon I walked to the same area and spotted this bird climbing in the branches.  I was able to get some video and noticed the dark patch under its neck.  The patch looked black in the black and white viewfinder on my camera.  When I played the video back in color, I saw the dark patch was red and I went to the literature to find out what it is.  The book showed it to be a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker and the male of the species.   

 

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Yellow-Rumped Warbler / Myrtle Warbler

Late in the afternoon of Monday October 29, 2007 I found one of these birds dead at Fine Arts building.  I think it succumbed to the overnight cold that we had for the first time this season or it ran into the brick building behind the tree line where I found it.  Late  in the afternoon of the previous Monday (October 23) I had seen a Warbler with yellow rump but I didn't have my camera and could not get a good look at it.  I thought it was a Palm Warbler but it could have been a Myrtle Warbler.  I only saw the bright yellow flash of the rump as it flew away from me.

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Blue-headed Vireo

On Friday April 30, 2010 one of these birds flew into a window at the back of BSB and died. 

 

 

Chipping Sparrow

Going back over some old pictures I came across frames of this bird - a Chipping Sparrow.  I have other similar shots but these are the best I have.
 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  BSB  (5/11/2005).  Mouse click on pictures to go to slide show.

 


 

Brown-headed Cowbird

Digital images from Panasonic GS-85  BSB (4/20/2007).  Mouse click on picture to go to MS Photo Story presentation.


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-85  BSB (4/20/2007).  Mouse click on picture to go to MS Photo Story presentation.

Late Friday afternoon April 20, 2007 I saw this bird in the Serviceberry Bushes behind BSB.  It looked like a thin Starling and I immediately thought "Cowbird".  The Cowbird is a common bird but I have not seen them on campus.  This bird flew across the street onto a roof but came back and "posed" for me.  Some of those images are displayed here.  After tiring of this it flew into the Serviceberry Bush on the side of BSB.  The Photo Story presentation show the sequence.  This is a female - the light stripes on its front and the dull white patch under its chin differentiate it from the male which is solid black with a brown head.

 

 A mix of birds at a feeder.


Digital images from Panasonic GS-85  BSB (4/19/2007).  Mouse click on picture to go to MS Photo Story presentation.

I put a Goldfinch feeder in a tree behind BSB and it has attracted some of the local residents.  While leaving work at about 6 PM Thursday April 19, 2007 there were a bunch of birds in the area.  The top shot is a White-throated Sparrow - this might be my best shot of this bird.  The left images shows a male Goldfinch on the feeder - the feeder is designed to force the finch to feed upside-down.  The last bird is a Dark-eyed Junko that was sitting under the feeder waiting for the Finch to drop some seed - this is the best image I've gotten of a Junko.  There were also some House Finches but I couldn't get any good shots of them.

 


American Woodcock


Digital images from Panasonic GS-85  BSB (3/30/2009).  Mouse click on picture to go to MS Photo Story presentation.

During lunchtime on Monday March 30, 2009 one of the security guard stopped by my office to say an "odd" bird was on the ground in front of the building.  I got my camera and went out to see what it was.  It was an American Woodcock.  I think it was just resting.  Sometimes they fly into the buildings but this one seemed undamaged.  The wind had been blowing strongly from the north for a few days - I think this bird was just tired.  I got the first pictures near the picnic tables - the picture on the left.  The bird later flew into the bushes on the berm in front of the building and I got the picture on the right. 

 


Digital image from Panasonic GS-85  BSB (3/20/2007).  Mouse click on picture to go to MS Photo Story presentation.

  
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-85  BSB (3/20/2007).  Mouse click on pictures to go to videos.

Coming back from a lunch time walk on Tuesday March 20, 2007, I found this bird sitting on the berm behind BSB.  It was just resting there.  That's snow/ice on the ground behind it left over from Friday's sleet storm.  The bird eventually flew across the street into a neighboring yard.  I was able to get some video as well as digital images.  The pictures above are linked to videos in Windows Media format and MS Photo Story. 

Mouse click here for combined Photo Story presentation - digital images and clipped frames.

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Purple Finch



Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-85  BSB (2/27/2007).  Mouse click on pictures to go to videos.

Late Tuesday afternoon February 27, 2007 I saw this bird on the west side of BSB.  It might be the same one seen one month earlier in the same tree.  I was using a new camera with better optics but I was having trouble finding this bird in the view-finder.  Below is the first sighting.
 



Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (1/26/2007).  Mouse click on pictures to go to videos.

Late Friday afternoon on January 26, 2007 I was in Debbie's office and as I looked at the window I saw a solitary small bird sitting in the Serviceberry Bush.  This was the coldest day of the year so far - it was in the single digits.  I went outside and captured some video of a Purple Finch.  These small birds are hard to tell apart from the numerous variations of Sparrows and Finches but some points of identification here are the uniformly colored brownish-red capped head, no white head stripes, and the white under tail coverts in the third image.  Below I try to show difference with side-by-side images.  A note about differences - individual birds can appear different from others of the same type; lighting and angle can enhance differences or similarities; birds change their appearance at different times of the year - winter coloration, breeding coloration, even diet can affect coloration. 

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Compare House Finch (left panes) and Purple Finch (right panes)

This House Finch has orange and yellow on its head and the front striping is darker, more distinctive.  Also, we see the white patch under the Purple Finch.  Both of these are males - the female lacks the coloration.

 

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Hermit Thrush

 

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (12/15/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

 On Friday December 15, 2006 about 11 AM our office was headed up the New Brunswick for a meeting.  I was driving one of the groups.  I took my car from the far parking lot into the lot just behind BSB.  While I was waiting, I noticed the flash of white feathers across the street at the Science Building.  I got out of my car and started walking that way.  It was one of my Mockingbirds and it crossed the street coming toward me.  I put some raisons down on the curb and the bird came over and ate a few.  After that it flew into the Serviceberry Bush toward Third St.  It's motion scared a small bird out of that bush and into one of the trees in the parking lot.  The bird looked different from what is normally seen this time of year.  It was bigger than the finches and sparrows that are around.  I pulled out my camera and got some shots of a Hermit Thrush.  I didn't realize that a Thrush would be around here in winter but the literature mentions that the Hermit Thrush is the only Thrush that can winter in this area. 

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Wood Thrush


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (9/7/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

While doing the research on the Hermit Thrush I was noting some the subtle points of difference between Thrushes.  A few days later I was looking at a small piece of Thrush video that I had labeled as Swainson's but noticed very strong spotting far down its front.  This type of spotting was mentioned in the literature regarding the Wood Thrush.  Also mentioned were stripes on the cheeks which can easily be seen here in the second image and a red coloration on the head which is visible in one frame..  These shots were taken on September 7, 2006.

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Cooper's Hawk

 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (11/17/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

   While leaving work on Friday November 11, 2006 I noticed this bird in the tall trees that separate the two parking lots behind BSB.  It's a Cooper's Hawk.  They look very similar to the Sharp-shinned Hawk, which I thought this might have been. 

 

 
Digital image Panasonic GS-19 taken at Johnson Park/Walt Whitman Center  (12/29/2006).  Click here to go to page.

 


Digital image Panasonic GS-85 taken at BSB west side on the berm (10/22/2007).  Click here to go to page.

This bird was on the west side of BSB late Monday afternoon on October 22, 2007.  This is a juvenile.  Mouse click on the picture to see other shots taken at that time.

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Red-eyed Vireo


Digital photo taken with Panasonic GS-19  behind BSB (September 26, 2006).  Mouse click on picture to go to page.

On September 26, 2006 I found this bird behind BSB.  It had run into the building and was stunned.  That's my hand in the photo.

 


 

American Kestrel (Small Falcon)


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Armitage Hall (8/18/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.
 

About 6 PM Friday evening August 18, 2006 while walking near Armitage Hall I saw this bird flying away from the Ben Franklin Bridge.  At first I thought it was a Dove because of its size.  I then noticed it had something in its claws.  As it was flying towards me, and I could see it better, I realized it was a small falcon.  The only Falcon this size is the American Kestrel.  I started my camera and got this images as it was having dinner on the edge of the roof of Armitage Hall (west side).  I believe it is a female.  The male has more color to it and it does not have thin tail bands.  The multiple thin dark bands seen here on the underside of the tail point to this being a female.

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Carolina Wren

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Quad area (2006).  Mouse click on pictures to go to the page.

A few of these birds were seen near Fine Arts in early July 2006.

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Magnolia Warbler
Windows Media video MS Photo Story video
Excel format stills Real Media video
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Quad area (5/24/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

On a rainy Saturday in late June I was reviewing some video that I thought was poor quality of a Black-throated Blue Warbler.  After processing the video I discovered I had misidentified the bird.  The video was taken on May 24, 2006 and I had been thinking (guessing) it's a Cerulean Warbler.  Then someone, looking at the page, suggested that it's a Magnolia Warbler, citing the dark bank on the tail.  The Magnolia Warbler has a yellow coloration on it's chest - which you can barely make out in the third frame above. 

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Yellow Warbler

Click here for MS Photo Story format
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (5/11/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

On May 11, 2006 I captured a quick video of a very small yellow bird in the Serviceberry Trees beside BSB.  It was a very quick bird so the video is not much.  I think it's a Yellow Warbler.  The color is right.  The beak is right for a Warbler.  The head shape looks right.  The dark wing color looks right.  I first thought it might be a female Yellowthroat but the wing color is wrong and the shape of the head is wrong.   

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Black-throated Blue Warbler Male



Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Quad area (5/16/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

Around lunch time May 16, 2006 I heard this bird while walking in the area near the picnic tables in front of the Campus Center.  It was a different song from the normal bird chatter in the area - Catbirds, Robins, Starlings, Sparrows, etc.  I started looking into a large tree there and quickly saw this active bird roaming the branches.  There were two of them.  One was higher in the tree (see below).  You see the second one at the end of the video.  I want to thank Jamie for helping me with tracking these birds through the tree and I want to thank my daughter Stephanie for helping me with the identification - she saw the blue coloration that I was having trouble noticing.  The dappled light coming through the leaf canopy was causing problems with my camera's color resolution.

It turns out the second bird mentioned here as "higher in the tree" and seen quickly at the end of the clip is a Northern Parula, a type of warbler.  I didn't realize that until I captured some video of the Northern Parula on May 24 and noticed the difference.

Friday May 26, 2006 I heard this bird around the Library.  I could not see it.

 

Black-throated Blue Warbler Female

 

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Science Building (5/16/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

On May 16, 2006, in the early evening, I came across this bird in a puddle next to the Science Building.  It's the female Black-throated Blue Warbler.  It is very different from the male.  One reference manual notes that these birds were once considered two different species because the male and female are so different.  The long white eyebrow and the white spot on the wing are keys to identify it.

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Northern Parula  male


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  Fine Arts area (5/24/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to go to page.

Around  12:30 May 24, 2006 I saw this bird near the Fine Arts building.  I thought this was a Black-throated Blue Warbler but the coloration on it's chest suggests something different.  The dark spot on its chest descends further down then the Black-throat's.  It does not have the long black strip down its side like the Black-throat - easily seen in the pictures above.  And finally the yellow swatch under the dark spot suggested something else.  It's the male Northern Parula.

This bird was also seen on May 16, 2007 in the same area - the Quad bordered by Fine Arts, Campus Center, Science Building and the Robeson Library.

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Northern Parula  female

Late Thursday afternoon, May 11, 2006 I saw a very small bird under the bushes at Fine Arts.  I pulled out my camera and captured a few seconds of video.  Through the viewfinder I thought it looked like a Mockingbird shrunk down to a tiny size.  I thought it might be a Kinglet.  My viewfinder is black and white and I didn't get to see the colors until I processed the video.  Then I saw the color on its back and front, and was amazed.  It took a while to research what it is but the Northern Parula (a tiny Warbler) is what I found.  This is a female.

 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (May 11, 2006) - at Fine Arts. Mouse click on pictures to go to page.

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Rose-breasted Grosbeak

Coming to work about 7:30 Thursday morning May 11, 2006, I notice this bird in the Serviceberry Bushes on the west side of BSB.  I thought it was the Rufus-sided Towhee that I have been seeing and trying to video.  I got some excellent (but noisy) video.  I then realized I had the wrong bird.  Doing some research, it turns out to be a Rose-breasted Grosbeak.  It remained in the bushes all day, I think, because it was there at 4:30 PM - still eating unripe and tiny berries.




Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (May 11, 2006) - on west side of BSB. Mouse click on pictures to see videos.
 

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Eastern Phoebe

On April 10, 2006, about 5 PM I saw this bird in front of the Robeson Library.  It flew into a small tree.  As I was about to try to get some close shots someone passed by the tree and disturbed the bird.  It flew to a upper branch in a large tree so I didn't bother to record it since, at that distance, the pictures would have been the same as those already here.

On Friday afternoon March 17, 2006, an Eastern Phoebe was spotted by the Fine Arts building.  It flew into a tree in front of the Robeson Library where these images were taken.  I heard the bird first, a soft whistle sound that I didn't recognize.  Then I saw it dart out of the bushes toward a small tree in front of the library.  When I first saw it I thought it looked like a Tufted Titmouse or an Eastern Kingbird shrunk down to the size of a Sparrow.  After checking resource material I believe it's an Eastern Phoebe which is a type of Flycatcher like the Eastern Kingbird.  In the videos you can see the subtle "tail-wag" that this bird does.  Compare it to the Palm Warbler.

Click here for video in Windows Media format Mouse click here to see frames in Adobe Photoshop Album format (.PDF)
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  front of Library (March 17, 2006).  Mouse click on pictures to go to full page.


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Grackle

Click here for MS Photo Story Presentation
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005). Mouse click on picture to see video.

I had been looking for some time to get some shots of this type of bird.  I see them infrequently and they never hang around long enough to get some pictures.  Friday evening August 5, 2005 about 6 PM as I was walking by the courtyard nestled between the Law School and the Admissions building and I noticed a host of birds - mostly House Sparrows and Robins.  I also saw this Grackle in a pine tree but I couldn't get any straight looks at it.  A few minutes later it landed on a park bench next to a Robin and I was able to capture some images. These birds are noted for the iridescence in their coloration which can be seen in the video attached to the images below.

Click here for MS Windows Media video  Click here for Real Media video
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005). Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

 

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Eastern Kingbird

MS Photo Story Presentation
Left frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005), right picture taken with Panasonic GS-19 (May 30, 2006). Mouse click on picture to go to full page.


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House Finch

Click on photo to go to House Finch page.      Click on photo to go to House Finch page.
Left - frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005).            Right - digital image Panasonic GS-19 (May 11, 2007) Click on picture to go to House Finch page.  Both at BSB.

 

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Robin


Digital photo taken with Panasonic GS-19 at BSB (June 1, 2006).  Mouse click on picture to branch to the Robins page.
Around lunchtime June 1, 2006 I decided to get some good pictures of a Robin.  This one decided to pose for me.

 

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Starling

MS Photo Story Presentation
 Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005).Mouse click on picture to see video.

I have started to add the "common" birds to this page like the Robin and House Finch.  Here we see a Starling in the berry trees.  The Starling swallows the berry whole.  The spring of 2005 seems to have been a bumper crop year for berries and attracting birds.

Click here to see video in Windows Media Format     
    Click here to see video in Real Player Format

 

 

 
Photos taken with Panasonic GS-85 (10/26/2009).

I parked in the far parking lot Monday morning about 7:45 on October 26, 2009.  I got out of my car and headed toward BSB.  I got to the end of the parking lot and remembered that I had left something in my car.  I walked back to the far corner where I park and saw this Starling on the fence.  It's in it's winter plumage but what was different about this bird is the white tail.  He was showing it off when I first saw it but by the time I got my camera out this was the best shot I could get before it flew off.

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Common Yellowthroat female

I had been seeing this bird darting through the bushes and finally got some pictures.  It was in the vicinity of a male Common Yellowthroat and the Black and White Warbler.  They all seemed to move together.  This was May 17, 2005.  This female was seen behind BSB.  I've also seen her on the west side of BSB and in front of the Science Building. 

Mouse click here to see video in Windows Media Player format.  Mouse click here to see video in Real Media Player format.
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  BSB (2005). Mouse click on pictures to see videos.
 


Common Yellowthroat male

Click here to see Picture Story version.
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  at BSB  (2005). Mouse click on picture to see video.

 

The male Common Yellowthroat is becoming more tolerant.  This was seen in front of BSB.

Mouse click on picture to branch to Common Yellowthroat page.
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  BSB (2005). Mouse click on picture to jump to main Common Yellowthroat page.

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Black and White Warbler
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i6360id.html

Seen behind BSB eating bugs in the bushes.  It was not afraid of me, almost ignored me as you can see in the videos.  It moved to a small pine tree on the west side of BSB and moved around the trunk like a nuthatch.

Click here to jump to main Black And White Warbler page  Click here to jump to main Black And White Warbler page
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005). Click on picture to jump to main Black and White Warbler page.

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Common Flicker or Yellow-shafted Flicker


Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (4/24/2006).  Click on picture to see video.
 

May 12, 2005 in the early evening I caught a glimpse of something frolicking with the Ovenbirds on the west side of BSB.  It was bigger than the Ovenbirds and had a white rump.  It flew further down the building and took off when I walked toward the area.  I then saw the large white spot on the rump as it flew off toward the bigger trees in the back parking lot.  This is a Common Flicker - one of the bigger woodpeckers.  They are bug eaters especially ants.  I have seen them pull up dirt between sidewalk blocks just to upset an ant nest enough to have them swam onto the sidewalk so the bird can eat them.

While coming into work about 7:45 on the morning of April 20, 2006, I saw this bird on the west side of BSB.  It flew into a tall tree near Second Street.  I had trouble with my camera and by the time I got it working properly the bird was gone.

Around lunch time on Friday April 21, 2006 I saw this bird on the west side of BSB.  There were some Robins around.  It flew into a small tree at the front corner of the building.  I got some poor video of it.  Then it flew the length of the building toward the back parking lot.  I was unable to get any other pictures but it is a beautiful bird. 

Monday afternoon April 24, 2006 this bird was around for a while in the Service Berry trees on the west side of BSB.  I was able to get some good video.

Coming into work on Monday March 26, 2007, after seeing a Cooper's Hawk in the BSB parking lot, I was walking on the west side of BSB and heard a strange bird noise in the large buttonwood across the street.  I tried looking for the source of the sound but couldn't pick it out of the tree.  Then I saw movement very high in the tree and noted a large bird there with a large black  spot on its front.  It took off heading for the trees where I had just seen the Hawk which was now gone.  As it flew off two other Flickers followed it into the trees.  I walked back toward those trees and the Flickers flew towards the tennis courts.  I got some video of their flight.

 
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (4/24/2006).  Click on picture to see video.
 

Bird in tree - Windows Media format

Bird in tree - Real Player format

Bird flying

 

Coming into work on Friday April 18, 2008 I saw one of these fly across the parking lot into one of the tall tree on the strip that separates lots 13 & 14.  I pulled out my camera hoping to get some photos from the under side of this bird - that's where you see the coloration when it spreads its wings.   I was too far away for any good video and as I moved nearer, it took off toward the old church behind me.  It flew past the church and out of sight for a moment.  Then showed itself again as it flew into one of the large trees by the tennis courts on 2nd Street.  Now it was even further away.  I stopped and tried to get some long distance footage but I too far.  A couple of times the bird would leave the tree, head for the bridge, circle around, and come back to the tennis court area.  I walked over in that direction to again try to get some video.  As I was moving toward that area and focused on the Flicker, a pair or darting/chasing Mockingbirds almost blinded me - mating season is here.  As I got into the area of the tennis courts, the bird could not be seen.  Then suddenly from another tree past the tennis courts, I saw a different Flicker head toward the bridge.  As it did, the one in the tree that I was trying to track followed it toward the bridge and out of sight. 

 

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American Redstart

Tuesday evening May 3, 2005, by Fine Arts I found this bird.  I first caught a glimpse of yellow in the trees.  I pulled out my camera while this thing was playing "peek-a-boo".  It kept moving out of line-of-sight.  It finally calmed down.  And eventually it  settled down for a nice inspection that you can see at the end of the video.

Click here for Photo Story version in Windows Media format  Click here for video in Real Player format

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005) - American Redstart at Fine Arts.  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.
Mouse click here to see best of the video.

On June 9, 2005 at about 5:30 PM I saw a Redstart for the second time.  It was in the small garden next to the Admissions Building.  It was on the Lion's Head Fountain there.
Mouse click here to see video in Windows Media format
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005) - American Redstart at Admissions Building. Mouse click on picture to see video.
Click here to see video in Real Media format.

On May 26, 2006 around lunch time I saw this bird in one of the large trees in front of Fine Arts.  It was moving too quickly to capture any video.  While I was watching it, a woman came up to me and mentioned that there was a Hawk by the Bursars Office.  I walked over there but the Hawk was gone.  While coming back I heard some very load Crow noises by the Law School.  It sounded like they were trying to chase a Hawk so I walked over there and got some video of the Hawk and some Crow audio.

While heading to the Registrar's Office in the early afternoon Thursday May 22, 2008 I heard a different bird noise as I walked through the Quad area.  I stopped to investigate and noted what I though was an American redstart.  On my way back to my office I saw the bird again by the breezeway at Fine Arts and it was a Redstart.

On Friday May 23, 2008 about 7:30 AM I saw the Redstart in the Quad area.

 

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Eastern Towhee  or  Rufus-sided Towhee


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (May 11, 2006 & May 12, 2006) - at Quad area near Fine Arts and Science Building. Mouse click on pictures to go to full page.

 

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Swainson's Thrush

Click to go to the full Swainson's Thrush page  Click to go to the full Swainson's Thrush page
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  at BSB on left and Fine Arts on right (2005). Click on picture to jump to the full Swainson's Thrush page.
 
 

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Ruby-crowned Kinglet
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i7490id.html

 
Click to go to the full Ruby-crowned Kinglet page  Click to go to the full Ruby-crowned Kinglet page
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  behind BSB on the left and west side of BSB on the right  (2005). Click on picture to jump to the full Ruby-crowned Kinglet page.

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Who am I?   I now think this is a White-throated Sparrow.

There seems to be a lot of color on the back and the beak seems wrong maybe a thrush? 
It was seen behind BSB.

Click here to see video in Real Media format
Black and tan back markings, long tail similar coloration
  
Gray throat and chest (left image - left center of frame) and gray head with a slight hook beak (right image - left center of frame)

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House Wren

On April 12, 2005, I was able to get this clip behind BSB.   It's a House Wren.  While I know this is a common bird, I have never seen one around here before.

 
 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005)

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Red-tailed Hawk

 


 

  Click here for Real Media video 
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  behind BSB (2005). Mouse click on picture to go to Hawk page.

 


 

Around lunch time Friday May 26, 2006 I captured some video of the Hawk being attacked by Crows.

Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  at the Law School (May 26, 2006). Mouse click on pictures to see Hawk page.

 

At the Science Building - 12/10/2007

Digital image from Panasonic GS-85  at the Science Building (December 10, 2007). Mouse click on picture to see Hawk page.
 

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Ovenbird
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i6740id.html

Click here to branch to Ovenbird page. Click here to branch to Ovenbird page.
Right Photo taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode (October 22, 2004.  Left frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  at Fine Arts (June 13, 2006). Mouse click on pictures to see page.

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Palm Warbler

On October 21, 2004, I was able to video tape this bird.  The images here were clipped from the video.  I thought this was a Tennessee Warbler (see below for similar sightings) but now I believe it's a Palm Warbler.  The image here doesn't really show the yellow coloration that caught my eye as I saw it in flight.   At the end of the video,  when the bird takes off,  you see the yellow in it's feathers. 

Click to see video  Click to see video
Photo taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV Camcorder.  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

Trying to ID this bird was difficult because there are many types of Warblers and similar birds.  The yellow flash at the end of the video gave me a clue and I started looking at reference material that mentioned a yellow rump.  There are a few Warblers that have a yellow rump - Magnolia Warbler, Cape May Warbler, Palm Warbler to name a few.  In reading the description of the Palm Warbler it was mentioned that the bird "wags" its tail.  I had noticed (and you can note also as you watch the video) on the video that the bird flicks its tail down periodically and I wondered if this could be a note on a description of this bird.    

Click for slide show from video
 Mouse click on picture to see video.

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Junco

On October 22, 2004, while watching the Mockingbirds, I spotted this Junco.  You can also see a sparrow in the left photo. 

 
Photos taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode


On April 7, 2005, I walked out the back door and startled a couple of Juncos.  A little later I was able to tape one of them.

 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005)

On April 18, 2005, I noticed 3 in the bushes behind BSB.  I am seeing Juncos a lot this season.

On October 22, 2005, I noticed a group of Juncos in a small tree on the north side of Armitage Hall next to the parking lot.  These are the first Juncos of the winter season.  It was a Saturday morning and I was headed for the Robeson Library when I came across the birds. 

On February 23, 2006 while coming into work there were two Juncos behind BSB.

On April 24, 2006 I spotted this bird behind BSB.  This seems very late in the season to be seeing this.  They are normally gone by late spring as they head north for the summer.

On August 31, 2006 I saw a Junko in front of the Robeson library at about 6:30.  The flash of the white feathers on the side of its tail made it easy to tell what this small gray bird was.  What's unusual here is the fact that this is a "winter" bird usually first noticed in October.  It migrates here from the north to spend the winter.  It must like Camden to stay so late and arrive so early.

On October 26, 2006 as I was coming into work I saw five or six of these birds near where I park in the corner of the far parking lot behind BSB.  They were mixed in with the normal Sparrows and Finches that live around the church next to the bridge.  As I walked around BSB there were some others in the bushes on the west side of BSB.

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Brown Thrasher

A Brown Thrasher is a relative of the Mockingbird.  Photo taken on October 5, 2004 in the flower garden next to the Children's Day Care Center diagonally across from the Walt Whitman Center.  See complete album at http://iis.camden.rutgers.edu/mchugh/trips-short/Camden_Garden_3/album1.html


Photo taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode
 

As I was coming into work at about 7:30 AM on April 17, 2006, I encounter a Brown Thrasher.  I was behind the BSB building looking for my Mockingbird but didn't see it.  I could hear it singing in the area.  I walked over to the west side of the building where I usually see it and noticed two birds squabbling in one of the Service Berry trees.  I think they were Robins but in the morning shadows it was hard to tell.  Just then two more birds flew past me one chasing the other.  The second one was my Mockingbird.  It's easy to recognize with the bright white feathers in the wings and tail.  The first bird had some color to it and I thought it was a Cardinal.  It then landed, for a second, on the berm at the corner of the building and, in the sunlight, I could see it was the Brown Thrasher.

 

As I was leaving the parking lot Friday evening about 6:30 on May 19, 2006 I saw this bird and was able to get some video.  I spotted it "thrash"ing some leaf litter looking for insects.  It then flew across the street onto the cyclone fence and then onto a wooden fence.


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  behind BSB (May 19, 2006). Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

See video in Real Media format.

 

Video in Windows Media format
MS Photo Story presentation Video in Real Media format
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  at Fine Arts (April 14, 2008). Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

Around lunch time Monday April 14, 2008, I was walking by the Fine Arts building at spotted this Brown Thrasher.  A Robin was hanging around with it - following it.  I had to keep my distance to get this video.  I first saw this bird by Fine Arts but it took off toward the Science Building with the Robin in tow.  It started digging near the Science Building rear steps.  It was behind a pole and could not see me but I couldn't get any video either.  I moved in that direction and it took off toward Fine Arts again.  I spotted it down the walkway that runs along the Fine Arts building.  I actually tracked the Robin to see where the Thrasher was.  It was following Thrasher back and forth in this area.

Around lunch time on Tuesday April 15, 2008, while I was watching a Rufus-sided Towhee near the bushes by Fine Arts, I saw this bird fly out of those bushes - the Spreading Yews bushes behind the Crepe Myrtle bushes.  It flew into one of the tall trees in the quad area.

 

 

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More female Common Yellowthroat

Also seen at L3 Communications May 27, 2003 and in the shrubs behind BSB on May 28, 2003.
 

On October 22, 2004, in the bushes in front of the Science Building, two of these small birds were seen.  You can see one of the birds in the center of this photo.


Photo taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode

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Snipe
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i2300id.html

Seen in front of BSB.

 
Another sighting of a Snipe, noted by Vijay on November 21, 2003, next to the Residence Hall.
This bird was in distress since it had flown into the side of the building. The campus police were summoned to assess the situation. They arrived and took the bird into protective custody. It was taken to headquarters and keep under surveillance for a few hours. Later in the day it regained its composure and demanded its release. The bird was permitted to leave on its own recognizance.
It continued on its journey south.

On October 29, 2004, while I was photographing the Ovenbird in front of the Fine Arts building, a local resident, who stopped to watch, mentions that yesterday he saw an "odd looking bird with a long beak" near the gym.  I asked if it was brown and round, and he says "yes".  It suggests a Snipe sighting. 

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Cedar Waxwings

Mouse click on Picture to branch to Cedar Waxwing page. Mouse click on Picture to branch to Cedar Waxwing page.
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  BSB  (2005).  Mouse click on pictures to see page.

 
Mouse click on Picture to branch to Cedar Waxwing page.
 
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 at BSB  (June 8, 2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see page.

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Mockingbird
http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/id/framlst/i7030id.html

These greet me most mornings in the BSB parking lot. They like yellow raisins.

Click here to go to Mockingbird page.
Lighter coloration, in tree behind BSB.
 Click here to go to Mockingbird page.
Darker coloration, on curb behind BSB.    Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005)

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Catbird

Click here for MS Media Player format video
 
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  in berry bushes at BSB (2005)  

This image shows the chestnut undertail coverts of this bird.  I had read about this coloration but had never noticed it before.  It was taken on the west side of BSB toward the end of the berry season 2005.

I have seen these eating berries from the same bush as the Cedar Waxwing.  I have also seen them in the small trees in front of the residence halls.

May 2, 2005 in front of Fine Arts.   This bird watched me as I got these images.
  
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005) at Fine Arts

These birds are not as "friendly" as the Mockingbirds.

After not seeing these birds for a while, I'm seeing a large number of them.  On May 3, 2005 in front of Fine Arts I saw one in the low bushes and a second one flew off to the left towards the Science Building.  While I watch the first one (who was watching me), three more walked out from behind bushes closer to the Fine Arts building - all about the same size.  An Ovenbird also walked out from behind the bushes with the other three Catbirds.


Click here for video in Windows Media Player format  Click here for video in Real Player format
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  at Fine Arts (2005)

These birds have been more prevalent and not as aloof.  I have had them fly up into a bush near me reminiscent of the actions of the Mockingbirds when they are looking for raisins from me.  I have been able to throw raisins to one of them.  He tore pieces from the raisin where the Mockingbirds would swallow them whole.

Click here for Real Player format video
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15  in berry bushes at BSB (2005)  

On October 18, 2005, while watching some newly arrived White-throated Sparrows, I noticed one of these skulking under a bush by Fine Arts.  I hadn't seen one these for a while.

On Friday May 5, 2006 I noticed four of these on the west side of BSB.  I have been noticing many on campus.

On Sunday May 7, 2006 they seem to be all over campus.  Any place you walk you see them along with the White-throated Sparrows.  They also don't seem to be as afraid of people as usual. 

Coming into work today May 12, 2006, there were over a dozen in the Serviceberry bushes eating unripe fruit (very small berries).  Many of the birds are doing this - Common Yellowthroat, Robins, Rose-breasted Grosbeak.

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Downy Woodpecker

 
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 at BSB (1/3/2007).  Mouse click on picture to see page.

 


 
Photos taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode (2005)  at BSB.  That is the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in the background.

 
 

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Cardinal

Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 at BSB (6/30/2005)

 

Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (1/4/2007).  Mouse click on the image to go to page.

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Often the Cardinals can be found between the Gym and Fine Arts.  I have heard them singing but normal the peep noise they make gives them away.

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Canada Goose

Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (5/12/2006). Mouse click on picture to see video.

On Friday May 12, 2006 around lunch time my group had a picnic at the edge of the furthest Rutgers parking lot.  This lot borders on a strip of park land and the Delaware River with a nice walking trail that leads to the Aquarium and the Children's Garden.   I got some unusual shots that day since this is a different environment.  Some other bird images captured that day were the Song Sparrow with good audio and the Double-crested Cormorant diving in the river.

Some Canada geese flying over the back parking lot, winter 2004.

 Usually seen in pairs flying over the parking lot.

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Double-crested Cormorant
Windows Media video
MS Photo Story Presentation Real Media video
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (5/12/2006). Mouse click on picture to see video.

  This bird is a Double-crested Cormorant.  It was fishing in the Delaware River as we were eating our lunch.  The bird dives for fish.  It can barely keep its body afloat and often you only see the head and neck sticking out of the water.

 

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Brown Creeper

Brown Creeper - as I was leaving work on April 9, 2004, this bird nearly flew into me in the parking lot of the BSB building. It landed on the trunk of a tree and proceeded to climb up the trunk.

 

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White-throated Sparrow

  
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19. Mouse click on picture to go to White-throated Sparrow page.
 

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Barn Swallow

May 6, 2004, while going to aid some users who had reported virus related problems, I heard these birds.  Looking around I saw three of them darting over the College Center. 

   

On May 23, 2005 I went out the backdoor of BSB about noon time.  I looked to the right and a Mockingbird flew up and I gave it some raisins.  Just then I heard a strange twittering toward the street.  I looked up and two Barn Swallows were landing on the power lines.  This is the closest I have been to them.  For the past few weeks I have heard them far overhead but they had been too far away for a good look at them.  I was able to get some shots but it was overcast so I couldn't get any good color.  The last frame on the right shows a white mark on the birds right wing.  The center frame shows off the long tail structure.

On May 11, 2006 I noticed these birds were back soaring over the campus.

During the summer of 2008 I discovered that these birds are nesting in the Science Building.  There are some huge air vents on the back side of the building and one of the vanes is bent making a larger opening in the vents.  I was watching the swallows one day and noted that they were flying in and out of that space in the vents.

 

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Baltimore Oriole

Sighted on May 6, 2004.


Photos taken with  LG camera/phone

Baltimore Oriole, May 6, 2004.  I didn't see this bird.  Debbie saw it first.  It was in distress since it had flown into the student dorm building (same thing the Snipe had done - they might be getting confused by the mirror effect of the windows).  Mary and Jason saw it.  Luckily Jason has a camera phone and got these shots.  When I got back from investigating a computer problem, I got the report about a bird that was hurt.  The story was that the bird was bright yellow with a black head.  That tells me it's a Goldfinch which I have seen in the area before.  Then Jason sent me the pictures and I saw too much black on the head to be a Goldfinch and the beak was wrong for a finch.  Then it hit me - Baltimore Oriole.  The color seems too bright for an oriole but that may be a function of the camera - I noticed some color in a shot I took of my Mockingbird (see the left car photo above, and Jason and I have the same type of camera phone) and I know the Mockingbird is gray.  What's unusual about this is that Orioles seem rare for this area in general not just in Camden.

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Dove

 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15 (2005).  On left is at BSB and on the right was at FA. Mouse click to go to Dove page.

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Song Sparrow


Digital image at BSB

 
Windows Media video
 Audio file of Song Sparrow Real Media video
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 (5/12/2006). Mouse click on picture to see videos.

On Friday May 12, 2006 around lunch time my group had a picnic at the edge of the furthest Rutgers parking lot.  I heard a bird singing and thought it was a Red-winged Blackbird.  But when I finally found it, it turned out to be a very load Song Sparrow.  The second image here has the sound file attached to it.

These are often heard in the trees.  In the clip here you hear the sparrow and the Mockingbird in the same tree alternating songs.  Of course, while I was capturing this another Mockingbird interrupted asking for raisins.



House Sparrow

These are always around.  I caught this one singing.

 


Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB parking lot (8/18/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to videos.

Leaving work on Friday about 6:30 August 18, 2006 I noticed a flock of House Sparrows and captured these images.  The first image is an adult male.  The second is an immature male.  The third is a group of females.

 

Some young female House Sparrow video.

 

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Field Sparrow


 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19  BSB (7/6/2006).  Mouse click on pictures to videos.

Around lunch time July 6, 2006 I spotted this bird in a Serviceberry tree on the side of BSB.  It had no fear of me and just sat there while I got some nice video.   This bird knew I was there, looked straight at me and ignored me while I was filming.  One other thing I noticed after processing the video was the small land snail on the branch by the Sparrow.

 


Seagull

Seagulls are common.  This pair was seen in the rear parking lot on February 18, 2005.

 
Photos taken with Panasonic GS-15 mini DV in SD mode.  That is the Benjamin Franklin Bridge in the background.  

 

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Pigeon (Rock Dove)

 
Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-15   in front of BSB  (2005)

These are a common site in the area.

 


Phone camera picture of old photo taken 7/1/2001

I just found this picture in my archives.  I'll have to find the original photo and scan it.  On Sunday July 1, 2001 I was at the "party" for the 75th birthday of the Benjamin Franklin Bridge - it borders the north side of the campus.  At some point during the day I came upon a NJ Army National Guard group who were handing out literature.  One of the service people had this Pigeon sitting on her shoulder.   I asked her how this had happened and she said the bird just flew up there.  It had been there for a while and was obviously enjoying the party.

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Crow

  
Frame clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 at Fine Arts  (June 6, 2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

These birds are often spotted on campus.  I have watched them while I was viewing a group of Cedar Waxwings in the berry bushes next to BSB.
 

Crows can often be seen at the top of BSB attempting to rip off a piece of metal stripping. They have been at it for months and can not remove the strip. I don't know what they have against the strip but they keep pulling at it. Today, July 21, 2003, there were two birds - one was watching the other one pulling on the strip - maybe it was supervising.

Around lunch time May 26, 2006 I captured some audio of these birds "attacking" a Hawk by the Law School.

On June 1, 2006 there were reports of these birds harassing the Hawk in the BSB parking lot and by the Law School.

On June 6, 2006 I shot some video of a Crow in the Quad area around lunch time.  The bird was breaking off branches probably for nesting material.

 

Frames clipped from video Panasonic GS-19 at Fine Arts  (June 6, 2006).  Mouse click on pictures to see videos.

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Blue Jay

I have never seen one of these on campus but I did find a feather in the far parking lot behind BSB.  I have also been told that they have been seen in the Camden Children's Garden which is about four blocks from campus.

On March 21, 2006 I found this feather in front on the gym. 

Jim Marino reported seeing a Blue Jay on campus.

On October 26, 2006 I believe I heard a Blue Jay by the tennis courts as I was coming into work.

On March 1, 2007 I found a feather on Third St. next to the Student Center.

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Turkey Vulture

I was given a report of this bird on April 28, 2008. This bird was on the top of the dorm building.  Facilities had a crane to lift an object on to the roof and encounter 5 birds.

 

 

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In these pages I have talked about two main areas for bird viewing - BSB (Business and Science building) and FA (Fine Arts or the "quad" area surrounded by Robeson Library (on the east), Campus Center (on the south), Science building (on the west) and Fine Arts (on the north).  In reality, to our feathered city dwellers, these areas are contiguous, separated only by a street (3rd Street) and five feet high cyclone fence and a fifty feet concrete pad that the Art students use for outdoor work.  The birds move back and forth unhindered while we have to walk around the buildings. 

I was curious about "when" I was seeing these birds and put together an Excel spreadsheet with some of the dates I observed the birds.  I also added the time and location.  I was curious because it is now late April of 2006 and I have not been seeing many birds.  Last year by this time there were many "new" birds - I have not seen those birds on campus yet.  Last year the Spring was cold and damp.  This year the Spring has been mild and dry.  Weather has an impact on the growing cycles and probably on insect activity which may be causing the difference in sightings.  The berries in the trees last year were the largest I have ever seen them.  This season they will probably be small due to lack of water.  There is a vacant lot with a cyclone fence north of the Ben Franklin Bridge the has Morning Glories growing all over the fence.  Last year the flowers were "ordinary" but the year before they were spectacular.  The cold and damp spring may have hampered their growth last year.  While the milder spring the year before helped their growth.

Late April 2006 I finally started seeing the same birds as last year.  The Swainson's Thrushes are back and I save seen a pair of them.  The Common Yellowthroat is back but I have only seen the male.  The Eastern or Rufus-sided Towhee is back but I didn't get any video of it.   I did get some video of the elusive Flicker.  And there was one new bird - the Eastern Phoebe.  During May I started to see many new birds - Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Northern Parula, Black-throated Blue Warbler (male and female), Yellow Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, and Cerulean Warbler.   I also captured some good shots of previous visitors - Yellow-shafted Flicker, the Brown Thrasher and Rufus-sided Towhee.  The Towhee could easily be seen for a solid week in the campus quad area.  Again this year the Waxwings were around as long as the Serviceberries were ripe.  I added two new birds that aren't that unusual - Carolina Wren and Chipping Sparrow.  And I also added some better pictures of our Crows, Hawks, and Robins.

During April 2006, Dr. Robert Evans from the Biology Department came over to talk to me about birds on campus.  He was making a project for his Ecology class.  He wanted to send his students around campus to look for "wild" life in an urban setting and was curious about the best ways to look for birds.  I mentioned being quiet and hunting with your ears - listen for the birds song or chirping or just rustling in the bushes.  I also mentioned moving slowly and watching for motion in the trees and bushes.  Another point is the angle of the sun - you want the sun behind you so you are not blinded by it.  Another concept is to look for places that are less traveled since people moving about will normally scare off the birds or a time of day when there are less people around.  You may also want the avoid windy days since they cause two problems: first, the wind whistling past your ears makes it hard to hear the birds and second, the motion of the leaves and branches caused by the wind make it hard to pick-up bird movement.

Courier-Post Article

The Rutgers Magazine Article



Other stuff:  Some "google" finds about our area:

Eagles (real birds) in our area (not that I have ever seen them):

http://sierraactivist.org/gallery/pettys

http://sierraactivist.org/gallery/pettys?page=2

http://www.dryl.org/Petty%20Island/petty_s_island_actions.htm

http://actionnetwork.org/campaign/pettysisland2/explanation

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Bird resources on the WEB:

http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/

http://www.birds.cornell.edu/

http://museum.gov.ns.ca/mnh/nature/nsbirds/

http://www.percevia.com/

http://crab.rutgers.edu/~saidel/classes/CompInBio/Audio/

http://newarkbioweb.rutgers.edu/Holzapfel Lab/Main Pages/BirdsOnCampus/Birds on Campus.htm

 

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Visits: 108939

Ed McHugh, OIT Camden Computing Service.
Copyright 2004 [OIT Camden]. All rights reserved.
Revised: Monday, November 01, 2010

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